Lesson #1: Time with Intention

 Lesson #1 from Our Series: 13 Countries, 13 Lessons at Sea

As we departed from San Diego back on January 7th, amidst the excitement and energy surrounding what was to come, Taylor and I both set about settling into our life on the ship, in the wonderful 5th deck cabin we now call home.

One of the very first challenges we encountered, and have still been struggling with for the entire journey, has been time management.

Time passes very differently when you’re living on a ship. There are no weeks or weekends here, just A days and B days, which allow for alternating schedules day to day.  Meal times are constant, and everyone is present all the time (since we’re all stuck on a ship together), yet it is often impossible to find people.

Working conditions can be difficult; because as a team we don’t have any “off” time, and the second we step out of our room both Taylor and I are usually bombarded with logistics and operations questions.

In addition, with connectivity ranging from “I can’t believe we can skype in the middle of the Pacific Ocean!” to hours spent on a single email or transaction, time required for any task has been incredibly unpredictable.

 

Given these challenges and new perspectives of time as it passes on the ship, Taylor and I have learned a HUGE lesson for how to value time for ourselves and for each other:

LESSON #1: Time Valued comes with intention

>>  Learn how to ASK FOR TIME

In our opinion, time is the most valuable resource everyone has, and when you live in a completely blended work/life environment, you have to evaluate time commitments on a totally different level.

For example, we learned early on that waking up and diving right into an intense work/team conversation in our room was not the best way to start our day. Instead, we learned to put on different “hats” for different times. Sometimes we’re wearing a work hat, other times we’re wearing a friend hat, and yet other times a roommate hat. And for each one, we need to clearly communicate what hat we want to wear, and what we need from others to share time effectively.

Over the course of this voyage, by setting time with intention and putting on different hats, we’re learning how to easily switch between a teammate cranking out gyshido time, an operations resource for our community, and a friend offering a shoulder to cry on.

 

So our takeaway lesson #1 sailing from San Diego  (& our brief stop in Ensenada) was:

 

Wear different hats,

(Clearly communicate what kind of time you are in,

And ASK for time, 

And the kind of time you need from those around you.)

 

Thanks for reading through, more lessons learned coming soon!

Image
From our “office” on the high seas,

Taylor Rowe & Shira B

Categories: ALL Entries, Life Lessons, Social Entrepreneurship, Unreasonable At Sea | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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